modern dance

YOU DON’T NEED MUCH TO DANCE: Greg Miller

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In this episode we speak with Greg Miller, founder of Dance Parade New York. We were fascinated to learn that Dance Parade was started in response to New York City’s Cabaret Laws, restrictive laws that require business owners to obtain an expensive Cabaret License in order to allow dancing in their establishments. Upholding the Cabaret Laws, the courts went so far as to say that “dance is not expressive.” We couldn’t disagree more, as you’ll hear in our further discussions with Greg about the 5Rhythms technique and the expressive community of Burning Man. Be sure to attend this year’s Dance Parade on Saturday, May 21st, where you’ll see 81 forms of dance! Learn more at http://danceparade.org/ and at https://www.facebook.com/DanceParadeNY.

DOCF: SHORT FILMS PROGRAM I


Indigo-Grey-Esteban-Robles_3We talked to a few audience members
about highlights from a strong roster of creative short films presented in the Shorts Program I at Dance On Camera Festival. We heard a lot about Indigo Grey and enthusiastic commentary about the rest of the roster as well. It was a great way to end our day at Dance on Camera Festival!

The following short films were presented:

A Portrait of Marc Brew, A Tap Dance in a Circle, Abismo, Approaching the Puddle, Honeymoon, Indigo Grey: The Passage, SajakThor, Still Light, Targeted Advertising, Tebe Tasi,

DOCF: SHORTS PROGRAM I – HONEYMOON

HoneyMoonWe spoke to Marta Renzi, choreographer and director of Honeymoon, a hot short film with a surprising twist featuring dancers Carlos Gonzalez and Tina Vasquez. She gave us a sneak peek into her inspiration and process behind the film before we saw it on the big screen. 

DOCF: THE OTHER SIDE OF STILLNESS

alexx_dev_sun2Each year, the Dance on Camera Festival at Lincoln Center screens one Work-in-Progress. through the Dance Film Association‘s Production Grant, Alexandra Shilling’s latest video project The Other Side of Stillness | Installation was selected and screened as a special event on February 13.  Alex talked to Pod de Deux about the process of making the project and what it was like working with DFA to present her work.

 

THEY WERE ROAD WARRIORS: Ron Honsa

Merce Cunningham

In this episode with Ron Honsa, Filmmaker and Executive Director of Moving Pictures, we continue coverage of the Dance on Camera Festival (DOCF), leading up to PDD’s “takeover” on Saturday, February 13th! Ron Honsa’s documentary about Ted Shawn and His Men Dancers, The Men Who Danced, will be honored this year at DOCF, 30 years after its initial release. Jessica sat down with Ron and learned more about his historical and contextual approach to documentary filmmaking, as well as the importance of Jacob’s Pillow, Ted Shawn, Ruth St. Denis, and the Denishawn Dance Company to the development of American modern dance.  Ron also revealed how he learned to film dance through a chance encounter with Alwin Nikolais and shared advice for dance filmmakers. The Men Who Danced will screen on Sunday, 2/14 followed by a moderated discussion with Norton Owen and Ron Honsa. The festival runs February 12th – 16th; tickets are still available here!

THIS IS ART: Heidi Latsky & Jerron Herman

Heidi 2Heidi Latsky joined us for Episode 13 and brought along a special guest in the form of her dancer, assistant and all-around “muse,” Jerron Herman! We were fascinated to learn about Heidi’s company, HLD, and her work with dancers who have disabilities and non-traditional dance bodies. We discussed how both Heidi and Jerron discovered dance as adults, the creation of Heidi’s “GIMP Project” and the unique artistic virtuosity that Heidi seeks in all of her performers. Be sure to see HLD perform on November 15th at 7pm at NYU’s Skirball Center, and attend the pre-show exhibit as well as the post-show Q&A. You can purchase tickets at http://nyuskirball.org/calendar/axislatsky and learn more about the company at http://heidilatskydance.com/!

Episode 9: Brock Labrenz

Brock LabrenzBrock Labrenz of An Films is a New York-based director who harnesses his extensive background in performance to create deliberate and sensual audio-visual experiences.  His creative endeavors find him somewhere between the exactitude of modern cinema and the ephemeral transition of the body through space.

In this episode, Brock shared his experiences training as a dancer at Juilliard and dancing for William Forsythe–in particular, Forsythe’s creative process.  We learned what it was like investigating Forsythe’s concept of choreographic objects in Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time and how audiences engaged with this work.  Brock also revealed how his interests in dance and film developed over time and how both mediums support his current work.

We had an intriguing discussion about the role of the choreographer in developing audience values and the importance in creating a conversation with the audience around a concept or process.  We also discussed how work conditions in the US and Europe have varying effects on the creative process and performance experience.